Brand Storytelling: Legends of The Modern Era

Hello Internet,

Since the beginning of civilization, we have been telling stories. From the fairy tales our parents use to read to us before bed, to our favourite TV shows, stories has played a large role in our lives and now they play a major role in the way we advertise.

 

Today, consumers are tired of the same old “Buy me because….” B.S and traditional marketing tactics are no longer effective. Companies are now taking a more glass roots approach of advertising and focusing more on selling lifestyles, memories and emotions. This is called Brand Storytelling and it’s nothing new in the world of marketing. Marketers have been using this technique for decades now, but the rise of social media, brand storytelling has become more of a priority in a company’s overall brand strategy.

But brand storytelling is more than the how the company was funded or the products it sells. It’s about the reason they exist (and to make money is not a good reason). For Chanel, they focus on legacy of their founder. Coco Chanel was more than just a designer, she inspired many designers to come and changed the way we think about fashion. And to the company’s fans, it’s their way of life.

This is a great example of brand storytelling and it has all of the right ingredients. Coco’s story is a rags to riches, stick it to the man, and change the world while you’re at it can inspire anyone.

(Interested in learning more about Chanel and his she changed the world, check out this book HERE!)

Another great way to tell a story is to use comedy. Laughter is a very powerful tool because it can not only get people’s attention quickly but it can also be used as a way to talk about topics that might be taboo or serious to the market. This video by The Rainforest Alliance is no  ordinary “Save the Rainforest” video. It uses comedy to catch our attention, educate us on the bigger issue and give us a call to action.

YET, just because you have a good story, doesn’t mean that it works for the brand. When this happens, we are often feel confused and that the contentdoesn’t fit with what we think of the brand. And this is exactly happened to McDonald’s. As an attempt to bring in a younger, more tech savvy market, they made this video here.

Am I the only one who’s thinking stranger danger while watching this video? And McDonald’s are full of brand storytelling fails. During TIFF (Toronto International Film Festival) this year they released these videos to promote McCafe. These one minute videos we all over Facebook and they were based off of famous classic films such as Braveheart and The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

Nice try McD’s but I can see the hot glue in the last video.

What’s an example of brand storytelling that you love or hate? Feel free to comment below and remember to share this with your friends.

Until next time, so long Internet!

Cites

Forbes Magazine

Chanel

McDonald’s

 

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Project Revisits: Conference Project

Hello Internet,

I have been working long and hard on my revisits and I’m here again to show you another project in the making. So, here’s my old typography project. It’s supposed to be materials for a fictional urban renewal conference called Paving Paradise. I really liked the project, but I didn’t like the direction I was going and it’s one of those projects you hope no one will ever see… EVER!

Brochure Cover

Brochure Cover

Brochure Page 1

Brochure Page 1

Brochure Page 1

Brochure Page 2

To me, urban renewal is more than making an old building look good, it’s improving the lives and function of a city. Almost like brining light into dark places. So when I found this image on Pinterest, I knew that this will be my inspiration for this project.

487a5191f94bee97f299672887da1e02

I really love the black and white images with the bright, bold type, but i needed to bring more paradise into the project. So then I found this image of a retro postcard and really got my creative juices flowing.

Hooray Retro!

Hooray Retro!

I really loved the script type and the shadow on the type. After a couple of hours in inDesign, I created my first attempted.

First try on this revisit

First try on this revisit

Sure it looks fine, but I wanted to make it small enough to fit in your pocket. Long story short, it was the cutest, yet the most ineffective booklet I ever created. Now, the brochure is bigger and flows a lot better.

New Brochure Cover

Spread 1

Spread 1

The brochure has a few details that needs to be dealt with, but its pretty much done after that. Afterwards, I now need to design some name tags, webpages and banners to complete the set.

What do you think of my work? Post your comments below and remember to share this blog with your friends!

Until next time Internet, Good Day.

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Project Revisit: Label

Hello Internet,

I’m reaching the end of my journey that is design school. But before I focus on graduating, there are some projects that need to be revisit. This one is the first of the four I will be revisiting and the results of this revisit is going better than expected!

Before

Before

This project is from my illustration class last year. It’s a label for a wine called holy water. I liked the idea of it, but this wasn’t the right style to suit it.

So I started researching of the concept of holy water, what’s it used, etc. While I was looking at some gorgeous churches, the one thing that always seems to stand out is the stained glass.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/31/Chartres_-_cathédrale_-_rosace_nord.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/31/Chartres_-_cathédrale_-_rosace_nord.jpg

During the middle ages, a lot of people couldn’t read because books were expensive and labour intensive to make. Because stained glass depicted stories from the bible, they were often called the poor man’s bible. So that got me thinking, what is a poor man’s holy water? Vodka. It can banish the evil spirits, cleanse a man of his sins and a whole lot of of things, but it’s the perfect concept for this project.

So I started with some sketches, after that I build the frame in Illustrator.

Screen Shot 2015-02-06 at 10.46.04 AM

After finding a reference image, I started creating the girl.

Screen Shot 2015-01-19 at 1.41.13 PM

After finishing the image, it time to colour it! I pulled colours out from the image to the right!

Screen Shot 2015-01-20 at 8.09.25 PM

And voila! One awesome illustration!

Looking good!

Looking good!

Now, I have to complete the back, work on the typography and find a bottle. I’m also thinking about getting this printed on a see-though paper like velum to get the full stained glass effect.

What do you think? Feel free to critique my work in the comments below and don’t forget to read some of my other post.

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Interview with Allison Thoohey from Cult

Hello Internet, today I got a special treat for you! I interviewed Allison Thoohey, the senior designer at Cult, to get her experience as a design student and some advice for students now. For those who are not aware with Cult, they are an ad firm in Calgary, Canada. They have strong philosophies in marketing and branding, which results in producing some great work. Some of their clients include The United Way, BMW, SportChek, and Michael’s.
I chose to interview Allison because she is where I see myself in a few more years, working in an ad firm, creating some awesome work, working with big clients, and doing what I love to do, being creative. This interview process was very eye-opening and a humble experience. I feel a little more prepared for when I go into the workforce.
Without any further ado, here is my interview with Allison:

What made you pick graphic design as a career?

I was always artistic growing up – I loved playing with shapes and colour, and I was always painting. When I was a teenager I ended up doing international modelling, and found inspiration in what the photographers and art directors were doing behind the camera. I was never comfortable in front of the camera and decided I was going to art direct magazines and ads when I grew up.
How was your design school experience overall?

I loved school. The Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary Alberta provided a great foundation for the fundamentals of design. It’s a 4 year program – the first 2 years were basically all fine art courses, drawing, and design fundamentals. All of our projects were done by hand – we were not even allowed to use the computer for design until our last semester in 3rd year. On the flip of this, our school is known for producing some world-class illustrators, which the curriculum was really catered for at the time I went there. The teachers really emphasized the importance of being a double threat designer/illustrator and how those 2 skills would get you the furthest. But, I never wanted to be an illustrator and I am not a very good illustrator. All the drawing and figure study classes, (while I’m happy I got to do them), never really helped my career directly. I am basically a full-time web-designer / art-director now and would of preferred developing other skills, like digital.

What are somethings you wish you knew before starting your career as a designer?

I wish a knew not to sweat the small stuff. There really is no such thing as the “perfect job” and any opportunity you get will have its positives and negatives and provide something valuable to you.

I wish I was prepared or more realistic, in what the day-to-day of a design career would actually look like. I chose this career because I wanted to be super social, constantly moving and collaborating with other people, but in reality I log a lot of hours at my desk alone – especially being the only designer at a small shop now! You need to constantly be seeking inspiration around you and in others, it doesn’t just come easy like it did in school!

What kind of skills do you think a Jr.Designer needs for today’s design industry?
 I think a Jr. Designer needs to have knowledge of the basic principles of design. So many people think they can be designers just because they know the software, but if you know the basic fundamentals of design – you will go further because your career won’t be limited to the software you know.
They need to show that they can think conceptually – beyond a pretty layout. This means they need to ALWAYS be thinking “multi-channel”. How does a brand or advertising problem translate across in-store, print, mobile and desktop? How does the customer interact with the brand across all these channels? How will the customer become an advertising vehicle for the brand? What will make the customer “buy-in” to the brand vs. just buying a product?
 

 What kind of advice would you give to a graphic design student right now?

1. Be open and work extremely hard at any opportunity that presents itself. You never now where a lead or a job will take you and you.
2. The first few years of your career you will most likely have to pump out A LOT of production work, and it won’t always be your vision. It can be disheartening but you will need to be patient and put in your time. You will feel like you have the best ideas that are not being heard, but “a cheetah has to earn its spots!” (my first boss/mentor told me that a few years ago). Be very aggressive and make sure your ideas are heard, but be patient when they are not used!
3. Be a sponge, and soak up everything you can from everyone around you. The best ideas can come from your project manager or your copywriter!
4. NO ONE is going to hold your hand in this industry and you need to take full responsibility of growing your career to where you want to go. Whether your freelancing or in an agency, you always need to be hustling and demanding more of yourself and more from the people around you. The industry is fickle and there is an abundance of talent, so you have to work very hard to stay relevant or to find new business.
5. KNOW DIGITAL. Know digital trends, be aware of best practices, and familiarize yourself with a basic knowledge of digital design for mobile and web. This is becoming less of an asset and more of a mandatory when agencies are looking to hire talent.
Please like & share:

Interview with Allison Thoohey from Cult

Hello Internet, today I got a special treat for you! I interviewed Allison Thoohey, the senior designer at Cult, to get her experience as a design student and some advice for students now. For those who are not aware with Cult, they are an ad firm in Calgary, Canada. They have strong philosophies in marketing and branding, which results in producing some great work. Some of there clients include The United Way, BMW, SportChek, and Michael’s.
I chose to interview Allison because she is where I see myself in a few more years, working in an ad firm, creating some awesome work, working with big clients, and doing what I love to do, being creative. This interview process was very eye-opening and a humble experience. I feel a little more prepared for when I go into the workforce.
Without any further ado, here is my interview with Allison

 

What made you pick graphic design as a career?

I was always artistic growing up – I loved playing with shapes and colour, and I was always painting. When I was a teenager I ended up doing international modelling, and found inspiration in what the photographers and art directors were doing behind the camera. I was never comfortable in front of the camera and decided I was going to art direct magazines and ads when I grew up.
How was your design school experience overall?

I loved school. The Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary Alberta provided a great foundation for the fundamentals of design. It’s a 4 year program – the first 2 years were basically all fine art courses, drawing, and design fundamentals. All of our projects were done by hand – we were not even allowed to use the computer for design until our last semester in 3rd year. On the flip of this, our school is known for producing some world-class illustrators, which the curriculum was really catered for at the time I went there. The teachers really emphasized the importance of being a double threat designer/illustrator and how those 2 skills would get you the furthest. But, I never wanted to be an illustrator and I am not a very good illustrator. All the drawing and figure study classes, (while I’m happy I got to do them), never really helped my career directly. I am basically a full-time web-designer / art-director now and would of preferred developing other skills, like digital.

What are somethings you wish you knew before starting your career as a designer?

I wish a knew not to sweat the small stuff. There really is no such thing as the “perfect job” and any opportunity you get will have its positives and negatives and provide something valuable to you.

I wish I was prepared or more realistic, in what the day-to-day of a design career would actually look like. I chose this career because I wanted to be super social, constantly moving and collaborating with other people, but in reality I log a lot of hours at my desk alone – especially being the only designer at a small shop now! You need to constantly be seeking inspiration around you and in others, it doesn’t just come easy like it did in school!

What kind of skills do you think a Jr.Designer needs for today’s design industry?
 I think a Jr. Designer needs to have a knowledge of the basic principles of design. So many people think they can be designers just because they know the software, but if you know the basic fundamentals of design – you will go further because your career won’t be limited to the software you know.
They need to show that they can think conceptually – beyond a pretty layout. This means they need to ALWAYS be thinking “multi-channel”. How does a brand or advertising problem translate across in-store, print, mobile and desktop? How does the customer interact with the brand across all these channels? How will the customer become an advertising vehicle for the brand? What will make the customer “buy-in” to the brand vs. just buying a product?
 

 What kind of advice would you give to a graphic design student right now?

1. Be open and work extremely hard at any opportunity that presents itself. You never now where a lead or a job will take you and you.
2. The first few years of your career you will most likely have to pump out A LOT of production work, and it won’t always be your vision. It can be disheartening but you will need to be patient and put in your time. You will feel like you have the best ideas that are not being heard, but “a cheetah has to earn its spots!” (my first boss/mentor told me that a few years ago). Be very aggressive and make sure your ideas are heard, but be patient when they are not used!
3. Be a sponge, and soak up everything you can from everyone around you. The best ideas can come from your project manager or your copywriter!
4. NO ONE is going to hold your hand in this industry and you need to take full responsibility of growing your career to where you want to go. Whether your freelancing or in an agency, you always need to be hustling and demanding more of yourself and more from the people around you. The industry is fickle and there is an abundance of talent, so you have to work very hard to stay relevant or to find new business.
5. KNOW DIGITAL. Know digital trends, be aware of best practices, and familiarize yourself with a basic knowledge of digital design for mobile and web. This is becoming less of an asset and more of a mandatory when agencies are looking to hire talent.
Please like & share:

Way-Finding: An Overlooked Accessibility Problem!

Hello Internet, let me tell you about this interesting project I’m doing in my design layout class!

My professor asked us to find an accessibility problem that the student body at St. Lawrence College face and solve it! As of now, this project is in the designing stage, but it was the research stage that made this project so interesting.

For the research part, our professor put us in groups with classmates we never worked with. This part scared me the most. I have so many bad group experiences in the past, that I avoid group work like the plague! Luckily, I had an awesome group and we kicked butt! When we were working together, we stayed focussed and on task. We also set goals and kept in frequent contact. Because of these factors, my group was able to be successful.

Anyways, back to the research.

Our topic was way-finding and I thought it wasn’t really a problem at first. We did our research though, we did lots of surveys, but it was the interviews that gave our the most information. As my group got deeper into our research, we discovered that way-finding is a problem that students face daily, but it’s even worse for people who are blind and/or have mobility issues. There are many barriers that they have to go though just to get to the same place as an average student and many of these barriers can be prevented.

At the end of our research, we discovered that the school map was the biggest contributing factor in way-finding around St. Lawrence College. There is much information that is not legible and it is not readable for someone who is colour blind. This design is not acceptable for a large body of people in a small area! Is way-finding an issue for you?

Please like & share:

Way-Finding: An Overlooked Accessibility Problem!

Hello Internet, let me tell you about this interesting project I’m doing in my design layout class!

My professor asked us to find an accessibility problem that the student body at St. Lawrence College face and solve it! As of now, this project is in the designing stage, but it was the research stage that made this project so interesting.

For the research part, our professor put us in groups with classmates we never worked with. This part scared me the most. I have so many bad group experiences in the past, that I avoid group work like the plague! Luckily, I had an awesome group and we kicked butt! When we were working together, we stayed focussed and on task. We also set goals and kept in frequent contact. Because of these factors, my group was able to be successful.

Anyways, back to the research.

Our topic was way-finding and I thought it wasn’t really a problem at first. We did our research though, we did lots of surveys, but it was the interviews that gave our the most information. As my group got deeper into our research, we discovered that way-finding is a problem that students face daily, but it’s even worse for people who are blind and/or have mobility issues. Their are many barriers that they have to go though just to get to the same place as an average student and many of these barriers can be prevented.

At the end of our research, we discovered that the school map was the biggest contributing factor in way-finding around St. Lawrence College. There is much information that is not legible and it is not readable for someone who is colour blind. This design is not acceptable for a large body of people in a small area! Is way-finding an issue for you?

Please like & share: