Project Revisits: Conference Project

Hello Internet,

I have been working long and hard on my revisits and I’m here again to show you another project in the making. So, here’s my old typography project. It’s supposed to be materials for a fictional urban renewal conference called Paving Paradise. I really liked the project, but I didn’t like the direction I was going and it’s one of those projects you hope no one will ever see… EVER!

Brochure Cover

Brochure Cover

Brochure Page 1

Brochure Page 1

Brochure Page 1

Brochure Page 2

To me, urban renewal is more than making an old building look good, it’s improving the lives and function of a city. Almost like brining light into dark places. So when I found this image on Pinterest, I knew that this will be my inspiration for this project.

487a5191f94bee97f299672887da1e02

I really love the black and white images with the bright, bold type, but i needed to bring more paradise into the project. So then I found this image of a retro postcard and really got my creative juices flowing.

Hooray Retro!

Hooray Retro!

I really loved the script type and the shadow on the type. After a couple of hours in inDesign, I created my first attempted.

First try on this revisit

First try on this revisit

Sure it looks fine, but I wanted to make it small enough to fit in your pocket. Long story short, it was the cutest, yet the most ineffective booklet I ever created. Now, the brochure is bigger and flows a lot better.

New Brochure Cover

Spread 1

Spread 1

The brochure has a few details that needs to be dealt with, but its pretty much done after that. Afterwards, I now need to design some name tags, webpages and banners to complete the set.

What do you think of my work? Post your comments below and remember to share this blog with your friends!

Until next time Internet, Good Day.

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The Brand Behind The Creed

Hello Internet,

I’m back from summer vacation and ready to blog again!

I want to take this time to share with you a new appreciation for one of favorite video games, the Assassin’s Creed franchise. What started as a way to de-stress from school, evolved into a deep love and appreciation for the branding and fine details that go into the games.

For those who are not familiar with the game, Assassin’s Creed is video game created and developed by Ubisoft Montreal. The game follows the life of Desmond Miles, a bartender who was kidnaped by a company called Abstergo. The people of Abstergo then stick Desmond into a machine called The Animus, a device capable of reading your ancestry’s memories. Throughout the series, players explore Desmond’s ancestries throughout history. The game is now Ubisoft’s best-selling franchise and now has a movie being filmed based off the games.

I first want to talk about the logo. From a designer’s point of view, this is probably the greatest branding challenge in history. Not only this brand mark has to work in our modern world, but also in a number of different time periods and cultures around the world. Overall, the brand mark is simple, memorable and works well in print and web.

Another point I want to bring up is about the evil corporation Abstergo. In the last couple of years, Ubisoft has brought their fictional company out of the sidelines and into the spotlight. Even though Abstergo plays a minor role in the overall Assassin’s Creed franchise, the amount of details that are put into the branding is insane! In the last Assassins Creed game you can explore the company’s headquarters and when I did this while playing I noticed the phenomenal amount of detail put into the branding. Through-out the game you can collect TV commercials, stationary, research documents, etc. But you can see an overall design policy that connects everything together, but also makes you believe that the company actually exists.

Overall, Ubisoft has put a lot of hard work and settle details into every game they produced and in my option, makes a world of a different. But it’s because of excellent Graphic Design that makes Assassin’s Creed stand out the most.

Know any other video games with some hardcore details? Leave a comment and remember to share this blog with you fellow assassins.

Until next time and remember, nothing is true and everything is permitted!

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Design Thinkers 2013

Hello Internet! Let me tell you about Design Thinks!

Every year, RGD (Registered Graphic Designers of Ontario) hold a big conference in Toronto and I got the chance to go with some of my fellow classmates and professors. The event had speakers from all branches of design come under one roof to inspire designers from across the country. This is a chance to speak to professionals in the field, learn outside a classroom environment and get lots of free swag (Because that’s the real reason why everyone is attending)!

Throughout the day, I heard many speakers, but one in particular inspire me the most. I attended Austin McGhie’s talk based off his book Brand is a Four Letter Word and I was blown away from what he said. The best piece of advice I thought he gave was “Don’t be afraid to think outside the box, just come back in”. To this day, this piece of advice helped me with my projects.

I highly recommend this event to everyone, especially students and take advantage of student pricing. I also recommend if you can, stay for the whole event and soak up as much inspiration as you can. And for those who have an RGD membership, use it! Not only you get discounts on resources the industry used, but you can gain access to great webinars and resources.

What was your favourite thing about Design Thinkers?

Please like & share:

Design Thinkers 2013

Hello Internet! Let me tell you about Design Thinks!

Every year, RGD (Registered Graphic Designers of Ontario) hold a big conference in Toronto and I got the chance to go with some of my fellow classmates and professors. The event had speakers from all branches of design come under one roof to inspire designers from across the country. This is a chance to speak to professionals in the field, learn outside a classroom environment and get lots of free swag (Because that’s the real reason why everyone is attending)!

Throughout the day, I heard many speakers, but one in particular inspire me the most. I attended Austin McGhie’s talk based off his book Brand is a Four Letter Word and I was blown away from what he said. The best piece of advice I thought he gave was “Don’t be afraid to think outside the box, just come back in”. To this day, this piece of advice helped me with my projects.

I highly recommend this event to everyone, especially students and take advantage of student pricing. I also recommend if you can, stay for the whole event and soak up as much inspiration as you can. And for those who have an RGD membership, use it! Not only you get discounts on resources the industry used, but you can gain access to great webinars and resources.

What was your favourite thing about Design Thinkers?

Please like & share:

Interview with Allison Thoohey from Cult

Hello Internet, today I got a special treat for you! I interviewed Allison Thoohey, the senior designer at Cult, to get her experience as a design student and some advice for students now. For those who are not aware with Cult, they are an ad firm in Calgary, Canada. They have strong philosophies in marketing and branding, which results in producing some great work. Some of their clients include The United Way, BMW, SportChek, and Michael’s.
I chose to interview Allison because she is where I see myself in a few more years, working in an ad firm, creating some awesome work, working with big clients, and doing what I love to do, being creative. This interview process was very eye-opening and a humble experience. I feel a little more prepared for when I go into the workforce.
Without any further ado, here is my interview with Allison:

What made you pick graphic design as a career?

I was always artistic growing up – I loved playing with shapes and colour, and I was always painting. When I was a teenager I ended up doing international modelling, and found inspiration in what the photographers and art directors were doing behind the camera. I was never comfortable in front of the camera and decided I was going to art direct magazines and ads when I grew up.
How was your design school experience overall?

I loved school. The Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary Alberta provided a great foundation for the fundamentals of design. It’s a 4 year program – the first 2 years were basically all fine art courses, drawing, and design fundamentals. All of our projects were done by hand – we were not even allowed to use the computer for design until our last semester in 3rd year. On the flip of this, our school is known for producing some world-class illustrators, which the curriculum was really catered for at the time I went there. The teachers really emphasized the importance of being a double threat designer/illustrator and how those 2 skills would get you the furthest. But, I never wanted to be an illustrator and I am not a very good illustrator. All the drawing and figure study classes, (while I’m happy I got to do them), never really helped my career directly. I am basically a full-time web-designer / art-director now and would of preferred developing other skills, like digital.

What are somethings you wish you knew before starting your career as a designer?

I wish a knew not to sweat the small stuff. There really is no such thing as the “perfect job” and any opportunity you get will have its positives and negatives and provide something valuable to you.

I wish I was prepared or more realistic, in what the day-to-day of a design career would actually look like. I chose this career because I wanted to be super social, constantly moving and collaborating with other people, but in reality I log a lot of hours at my desk alone – especially being the only designer at a small shop now! You need to constantly be seeking inspiration around you and in others, it doesn’t just come easy like it did in school!

What kind of skills do you think a Jr.Designer needs for today’s design industry?
 I think a Jr. Designer needs to have knowledge of the basic principles of design. So many people think they can be designers just because they know the software, but if you know the basic fundamentals of design – you will go further because your career won’t be limited to the software you know.
They need to show that they can think conceptually – beyond a pretty layout. This means they need to ALWAYS be thinking “multi-channel”. How does a brand or advertising problem translate across in-store, print, mobile and desktop? How does the customer interact with the brand across all these channels? How will the customer become an advertising vehicle for the brand? What will make the customer “buy-in” to the brand vs. just buying a product?
 

 What kind of advice would you give to a graphic design student right now?

1. Be open and work extremely hard at any opportunity that presents itself. You never now where a lead or a job will take you and you.
2. The first few years of your career you will most likely have to pump out A LOT of production work, and it won’t always be your vision. It can be disheartening but you will need to be patient and put in your time. You will feel like you have the best ideas that are not being heard, but “a cheetah has to earn its spots!” (my first boss/mentor told me that a few years ago). Be very aggressive and make sure your ideas are heard, but be patient when they are not used!
3. Be a sponge, and soak up everything you can from everyone around you. The best ideas can come from your project manager or your copywriter!
4. NO ONE is going to hold your hand in this industry and you need to take full responsibility of growing your career to where you want to go. Whether your freelancing or in an agency, you always need to be hustling and demanding more of yourself and more from the people around you. The industry is fickle and there is an abundance of talent, so you have to work very hard to stay relevant or to find new business.
5. KNOW DIGITAL. Know digital trends, be aware of best practices, and familiarize yourself with a basic knowledge of digital design for mobile and web. This is becoming less of an asset and more of a mandatory when agencies are looking to hire talent.
Please like & share:

Interview with Allison Thoohey from Cult

Hello Internet, today I got a special treat for you! I interviewed Allison Thoohey, the senior designer at Cult, to get her experience as a design student and some advice for students now. For those who are not aware with Cult, they are an ad firm in Calgary, Canada. They have strong philosophies in marketing and branding, which results in producing some great work. Some of there clients include The United Way, BMW, SportChek, and Michael’s.
I chose to interview Allison because she is where I see myself in a few more years, working in an ad firm, creating some awesome work, working with big clients, and doing what I love to do, being creative. This interview process was very eye-opening and a humble experience. I feel a little more prepared for when I go into the workforce.
Without any further ado, here is my interview with Allison

 

What made you pick graphic design as a career?

I was always artistic growing up – I loved playing with shapes and colour, and I was always painting. When I was a teenager I ended up doing international modelling, and found inspiration in what the photographers and art directors were doing behind the camera. I was never comfortable in front of the camera and decided I was going to art direct magazines and ads when I grew up.
How was your design school experience overall?

I loved school. The Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary Alberta provided a great foundation for the fundamentals of design. It’s a 4 year program – the first 2 years were basically all fine art courses, drawing, and design fundamentals. All of our projects were done by hand – we were not even allowed to use the computer for design until our last semester in 3rd year. On the flip of this, our school is known for producing some world-class illustrators, which the curriculum was really catered for at the time I went there. The teachers really emphasized the importance of being a double threat designer/illustrator and how those 2 skills would get you the furthest. But, I never wanted to be an illustrator and I am not a very good illustrator. All the drawing and figure study classes, (while I’m happy I got to do them), never really helped my career directly. I am basically a full-time web-designer / art-director now and would of preferred developing other skills, like digital.

What are somethings you wish you knew before starting your career as a designer?

I wish a knew not to sweat the small stuff. There really is no such thing as the “perfect job” and any opportunity you get will have its positives and negatives and provide something valuable to you.

I wish I was prepared or more realistic, in what the day-to-day of a design career would actually look like. I chose this career because I wanted to be super social, constantly moving and collaborating with other people, but in reality I log a lot of hours at my desk alone – especially being the only designer at a small shop now! You need to constantly be seeking inspiration around you and in others, it doesn’t just come easy like it did in school!

What kind of skills do you think a Jr.Designer needs for today’s design industry?
 I think a Jr. Designer needs to have a knowledge of the basic principles of design. So many people think they can be designers just because they know the software, but if you know the basic fundamentals of design – you will go further because your career won’t be limited to the software you know.
They need to show that they can think conceptually – beyond a pretty layout. This means they need to ALWAYS be thinking “multi-channel”. How does a brand or advertising problem translate across in-store, print, mobile and desktop? How does the customer interact with the brand across all these channels? How will the customer become an advertising vehicle for the brand? What will make the customer “buy-in” to the brand vs. just buying a product?
 

 What kind of advice would you give to a graphic design student right now?

1. Be open and work extremely hard at any opportunity that presents itself. You never now where a lead or a job will take you and you.
2. The first few years of your career you will most likely have to pump out A LOT of production work, and it won’t always be your vision. It can be disheartening but you will need to be patient and put in your time. You will feel like you have the best ideas that are not being heard, but “a cheetah has to earn its spots!” (my first boss/mentor told me that a few years ago). Be very aggressive and make sure your ideas are heard, but be patient when they are not used!
3. Be a sponge, and soak up everything you can from everyone around you. The best ideas can come from your project manager or your copywriter!
4. NO ONE is going to hold your hand in this industry and you need to take full responsibility of growing your career to where you want to go. Whether your freelancing or in an agency, you always need to be hustling and demanding more of yourself and more from the people around you. The industry is fickle and there is an abundance of talent, so you have to work very hard to stay relevant or to find new business.
5. KNOW DIGITAL. Know digital trends, be aware of best practices, and familiarize yourself with a basic knowledge of digital design for mobile and web. This is becoming less of an asset and more of a mandatory when agencies are looking to hire talent.
Please like & share: